Shark fisheries in Central America a review and update (ESP)

  • José Rodrigo Rojas M. Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)
  • Jorge Campos M. Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)
  • Álvaro Segura Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)
  • Moisés Mug V. Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)
  • Raúl Campos Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)
  • Omar Rodríguez Instituto de los Recursos Costeros y Marinos (INRECOSMAR)

Abstract

The demand for shark products especially fins and cartilage, has led to an expansion in fisheries and trade throughout the region. Increased fishing efforts, scarce biological data, and lack of management are key factors that negatively impact this fishery. A project under way aims to gather basic information on population status, nursery and fishery grounds, socioeconomics of the fishery, and necessary conservation measures. Twenty four commercially valuable species have been identified. The most important are Carcharhinus falciformis and Nasolamia velox (Guatemala), C. falciformis (Nicaragua), C. falciformis and M. dorsalis (Costa Rica), C. obscurus (El Salvador), and C. limbatus (Panama). Commercial products include the meat, fin, oil, cartilage, and skin. Shark fins are the most valuable product (i.e. dried caudal fins sell from $US 150 to 400 per kg in Costa Rica) and are exported to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and the United States.

Published
2000-01-01
How to Cite
Rojas M., J., Campos M., J., Segura, Álvaro, Mug V., M., Campos, R., & Rodríguez, O. (2000). Shark fisheries in Central America a review and update (ESP). Uniciencia, 17(1), 49-56. Retrieved from https://www.revistas.una.ac.cr/index.php/uniciencia/article/view/5706
Section
Original scientific papers (evaluated by academic peers)

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